aka Cauliflower Mashed Potatoes that you actually want to eat!

Cauliflower is so popular these days – I’ve seen it in everything from crackers to pizza crust. One of my favorite cauliflower recipes has been the Whole Foods version where it’s roasted with curry and peas. That is until I tried Della’s cauliflower mash!! It is DELLA-icious. Her trick is to use half cauliflower and half potatoes, plus herbs, real butter and half and half for a rich flavor. I promise: this is a cauliflower-potato mash that you will actually want to eat.

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Mashed Cauliflower vs Mashed Potatoes

Why use cauliflower at all? Nutritionally speaking, the more diversity you have in your diet the better. So having both cauliflower and potatoes together is better than just potatoes. In fact, the World’s Healthiest Foods recommends eating 3/4 – 1 cup or more of cruciferous vegetables per day. (I can’t say that I meet that goal daily!) Cauliflower, as a cruciferous vegetable, has phytonutrients called glucosinolates, which support multiple of our body’s systems, and antioxidants. Don’t be fooled by its white color – cauliflower is just as rich in phytonutrients as its green cousins. (source).

Cauliflower v Potato Nutrition Facts

Nutritionally, cauliflower is lighter in calories and carbs than potatoes and is more nutrient dense. That’s why it’s popular among the low carb and weight loss communities. Here’s a side by side comparison of cooked cauliflower versus potatoes:

Cauliflower

  • 1 cup, cooked
  • 29 calories
  • 5 grams carbs
  • 2.25 grams protein
  • 2.5 grams fiber
  • Glycemic index: very low
  • Excellent source of vitamin C, K, folate, B6 and pantothenic acid

Potatoes

  • 1 cup, cooked
  • 161 calories
  • 36 grams carbs
  • 4 grams protein
  • 3.8 grams fiber
  • Glycemic index: high
  • Excellent source of nothing, but very good source of vitamin B6!

Next to one another, cauliflower has a more impressive nutritional resume and is a bit more gentle on the blood sugar, but potatoes are still considered one of the world’s healthiest foods! And they are delicious – who doesn’t love mashed potatoes?! They contain the phytonutrients carotenoids, flavonoids, and caffeic acid, and the vitamins and minerals they contain all contribute to overall good health. (Source)

Consider this recipe a combination of the rich flavor of mashed potatoes enhanced with the nutritional powerhouse of cauliflower.

How To Make Cauliflower Mashed Potatoes

This cauliflower mashed potatoes recipe makes a great side dish whenever you’d normally serve mashed taters, and you can jazz it up even more with sour cream or gravy if you fancy. If your goal is a healthy family I bet they won’t even know there is cauliflower involved. Note you could probably use an instant pot, but I haven’t tested it that way!

Ingredients you will need
  • 4-5 medium yukon gold potatoes
  • 12 oz bag frozen riced cauliflower
  • 1/2 cup water or vegetable broth
  • 1/2 cup half and half
  • 1 stick butter
  • 1/2 tsp dried thyme
  • 1/2 tsp dried rosemary
  • 1/2 tsp garlic powder
  • 2 tbsp grated Parmesan
  • 1/2 tsp kosher salt
  • Black pepper to taste
1. Boil potatoes in bite-size pieces until fork tender and drain.
2. In same pot, steam cauliflower rice in a metal colander to preserve nutrients

3. When cauliflower is tender, dump water from pot and add cauliflower, potatoes, broth, cream. Add butter, herbs, and seasonings. Bring to a simmer.

4. Using an immersion blender, blend and simmer until desired texture is reached. You could also use a food processor.

Cauliflower Mashed Potatoes

This blend of cauliflower and mashed potatoes makes a great side dish whenever you’d normally serve mashed taters.

  • 4-5 medium yukon gold potatoes
  • 12 oz bag frozen riced cauliflower
  • 1/2 cup water or vegetable broth
  • 1/2 cup half and half
  • 1 stick butter
  • 1/2 tsp dried thyme
  • 1/2 tsp dried rosemary
  • 1/2 tsp garlic powder
  • 2 tbsp grated Parmesan
  • 1/2 tsp kosher salt
  • Black pepper to taste
  1. Boil potatoes in bite-size pieces until fork tender and drain.
  2. In same pot, steam cauliflower rice in a metal colander to preserve nutrients
  3. When cauliflower is tender, dump water from pot and add cauliflower, potatoes, broth, cream. Add butter, herbs, and seasonings. Bring to a simmer.
  4. Using an immersion blender, blend and simmer until desired texture is reached.

The post Mashed Cauliflower vs Mashed Potatoes appeared first on Kath Eats Real Food.

* This article was originally published here

The Best Way to Store Potatoes

You know potatoes will keep the longest when stored in a cool, dark place—specifically somewhere that’s around 50° F. So just toss them down in your root cellar and call it a day. But I don’t have a root cellar—do you?

In case, like most people, you don’t have a root cellar, here are the four best tips for how to store potatoes and make them last:

Read More >>

* This article was originally published here

Apple Cider Chicken Thighs with Sweet Potatoes

Want a perfect fall weeknight meal? These Apple Cider Chicken Thighs are it. Simmered in the oven with sweet potatoes and onions, it’s a one-pot skillet dinner that’ll fill you up without stressing you out.

Continue reading “Apple Cider Chicken Thighs with Sweet Potatoes” »

* This article was originally published here

It’s almost Thanksgiving! Have you signed up for our newsletter yet? Leading up to the big day, get all the best tips from Food52 editors right to your inbox. Today, we’re revisiting a reader-favorite viral hack for peeling potatoes—and for making your life (especially in a few weeks, come Turkey Day) SO much easier.


If you haven’t heard, we’re deep in the throes of potato season. As temperatures drop, root vegetables abound. With a seasonal influx of these underground tubers, it’s best you know your way around one. So, I present to you, a potato peeling hack that will save you time, effort, and equipment.

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* This article was originally published here

Salt & Vinegar Mashed Potatoes Are More Addictive Than Potato Chips
Salt & Vinegar Mashed Potatoes Are More Addictive Than Potato Chips

A Big Little Recipe has the smallest-possible ingredient list and big everything else: flavor, creativity, wow factor. Psst—we don’t count water, salt, black pepper, and certain fats (specifically, 1/2 cup or less of olive oil, vegetable oil, and butter), since we’re guessing you have those covered. Today, we’re off-roading classic mashed potatoes.


Photo by Bobbi Lin

When potato chips started being commercially produced in the early 20th century, plain was a given. They were “just thin slices of potato, fried and salted,” Janis Thiessen writes in Snacks: a Canadian Food History. It wasn’t until the mid-1900s that flavors, like barbecue and salt-and-vinegar, started springing up.

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* This article was originally published here

Crispy Hasselback Potatoes

Crispy Hasselback Potatoes

Vertical slicing and an extra-long roast in the oven make these potatoes both beautiful and delicious. Look at all those crispy edges!

Continue reading “Crispy Hasselback Potatoes” »

* This article was originally published here

According to our Absolute Best Tests columnist, Ella Quittner, there are 11 ways to make mashed potatoes (I won’t spoil which method she crowned champion).

But with all those buttery, fluffy mashed potatoes come leftovers—and during the winter months especially, lots of leftovers.

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* This article was originally published here

Instant Pot Mashed Potatoes

Instant Pot Mashed Potatoes

Make mashed potatoes in the Instant Pot or pressure cooker! They’re ready in about 30 minutes, from start to finish and are perfect every time. Add garlic if you like!

Continue reading “Instant Pot Mashed Potatoes” »

* This article was originally published here

Slow Cooker Mashed Potatoes

Slow Cooker Mashed Potatoes

Slow Cooker Mashed Potatoes are so easy and they free up some much-needed stovetop space for Thanksgiving and other holidays!

Continue reading “Slow Cooker Mashed Potatoes” »

* This article was originally published here


Mashed potato problems and pitfalls, and how to avoid or fix them.
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* This article was originally published here

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