17 Last-Minute Potluck Ideas That Feed a Crowd in No Time Flat
17 Last-Minute Potluck Ideas That Feed a Crowd in No Time Flat
17 Last-Minute Potluck Ideas That Feed a Crowd in No Time Flat
17 Last-Minute Potluck Ideas That Feed a Crowd in No Time Flat
17 Last-Minute Potluck Ideas That Feed a Crowd in No Time Flat
17 Last-Minute Potluck Ideas That Feed a Crowd in No Time Flat
17 Last-Minute Potluck Ideas That Feed a Crowd in No Time Flat
17 Last-Minute Potluck Ideas That Feed a Crowd in No Time Flat
17 Last-Minute Potluck Ideas That Feed a Crowd in No Time Flat
17 Last-Minute Potluck Ideas That Feed a Crowd in No Time Flat
17 Last-Minute Potluck Ideas That Feed a Crowd in No Time Flat
17 Last-Minute Potluck Ideas That Feed a Crowd in No Time Flat
17 Last-Minute Potluck Ideas That Feed a Crowd in No Time Flat
17 Last-Minute Potluck Ideas That Feed a Crowd in No Time Flat
17 Last-Minute Potluck Ideas That Feed a Crowd in No Time Flat
17 Last-Minute Potluck Ideas That Feed a Crowd in No Time Flat
17 Last-Minute Potluck Ideas That Feed a Crowd in No Time Flat

It’s almost the weekend and you’re excited to get to that picnic, barbecue, or cookout your friends invited you to. But as you look back at the invitation (or scroll to the bottom of the email) for the get-together, you realize that it says “potluck.”

…Wait, what? Oh no. You definitely didn’t see that before. You most certainly are not prepared.

But never fear. Food52 is here to save you with some effortless recipes fit for a crowd. Wow your friends with rich chocolate cake or spicy salsa.

Read More >>

* This article was originally published here

3-Minute Chicken Breasts Are a Weeknight Dinner Miracle

A Big Little Recipe has the smallest-possible ingredient list and big everything else: flavor, creativity, wow factor. Psst—we don’t count water, salt, black pepper, and certain fats (specifically, 1/2 cup or less of olive oil, vegetable oil, and butter), since we’re guessing you have those covered. Today, we’re cooking chicken in the time it takes to listen to a song.


How long does chicken take to cook? Depends on the cut. A whole roast chicken takes 10 minutes or more per pound. Braised chicken takes between an hour and an hour and a half. Skillet chicken thighs take close to an hour. Even Instant Pot chicken takes at least 10 minutes, and that’s after the pressure builds.

Read More >>

* This article was originally published here

You can now find many brands of organic, ready-to-eat canned Black Beans that are healthier and tastier than conventionally produced Black Beans. This recipe takes just minutes to prepare and can be served as a side dish or used in other recipes …

* This article was originally published here

I’ll level with you. As much as I like to spend hours tinkering with a complicated recipe every now and then (I once lost an entire weekend to these Parisian macarons), the majority of the time I crave fast and easy dishes that still deliver tons of flavor.

That’s where the reliable 30-minute meal comes in. The 30-minute meal embodies everything I believe in: quick, simple, and inherently smart. Endlessly useful.

Read More >>

* This article was originally published here

Food52
15 Last-Minute Thanksgiving Desserts, Because Everything's *Totally* Fine

15 Last-Minute Thanksgiving Desserts, Because Everything’s *Totally* Fine

If you’re hosting Thanksgiving, you’ve got a lot on your plate: roast the perfect bird, set the table, whip out dozens of pillowy rolls, pick up the wine, find enough serving spoons. And even if you’re a super-duper planner with spreadsheets and seat assignments, things fall through the cracks. For my family, that slip-up always seems to be dessert.

Maybe it’s because no one in my family considers themselves a “baker,” but more often than not our Thanksgiving morning involves a last-minute pie run (with an added ice cream stop) to Walmart. This year, I’m determined to be a better planner, to make a dessert as worthy as the turkey.

Read More >>

A Vegan Thanksgiving Menu So Delicious & Hearty, Everyone Will Want Seconds

A Vegan Thanksgiving Menu So Delicious & Hearty, Everyone Will Want Seconds

Any person who says that turkey is the star of Thanksgiving dinner has never been invited to vegan-cook-extraordinaire Gena Hamshaw‘s celebration. Hamshaw makes vegan Thanksgiving look not only easy to pull off, but also absurdly delicious, creamy, and hearty.

“As tempting as it was—always is—to create a Thanksgiving menu that consists of 60% sweet potatoes and 35% bread-y things (with 5% saved for dessert), I was happy that the Menu Maker prompted me to include green things (hello, tahini roasted broccoli) and one crispy salad with carrot ribbons and avocado. The heavenly oatmeal molasses rolls are heavenly indeed, and don’t let the egg and butter deter you if you’re vegan. I’ve made them many times over omitting the egg (no need to replace it) and using vegan butterEarth Balance is my favorite.”

Read More >>

Food52
A 5-Minute Steak Dinner for One—for Those Nights When You Just Can't

A 5-Minute Steak Dinner for One—for Those Nights When You Just Can’t

What can you do in five minutes? If you’re as elegant, as dexterous as I am, then you can probably: pick your nose in five minutes; trip over that gargantuan pile of dirty laundry and lie on the floor, immobile, for five minutes; let your dog lick your face for five minutes.

You can probably cook a steak dinner for one in five minutes.

Read More >>

The One Recipe Instruction I'll Never, Ever Follow

The One Recipe Instruction I’ll Never, Ever Follow

I’m a full-time recipe developer, so admittedly, I don’t get to make other people’s recipes as often as I’d like these days. But when I do, I have a vested interest in maximum deliciousness. Which means following any prescribed instructions to a T the first time I make it—all in pursuit of promised crinkly tops, or jammy textures, or the gooiest of cookie centers. I’ll read through a new recipe several times before commencing, and adhere to its directives with drill sergeant-like accuracy.

There is, however, one marked exception: sifting. I have so many memories of being a child in the kitchen asking to help with something or another, and being handed the sifter. Which, in our household, was one of those deceptively charming old-fashioned metal ones. Not the kind with a friendly crank on the side, though—it had a vertical handle like that of a giant coffee mug, fitted with a lever that you’d have to squeeze inward over and over again, like you were firing off a staple gun, to get ingredients to pass through a sieve layer.

Read More >>

The 2-Ingredient Apple Cocktail You’ve Probably Never Heard Of

The 2-Ingredient Apple Cocktail You’ve Probably Never Heard Of

The tea’s a-brewing and the fireplace’s a-crackling. We’re getting Cozy at Home with warm-and-cuddly ideas for cooking, decorating, and more—so grab your fuzzy slippers and join us.

Every fall, if I’ve got a housewarming, dinner party, holiday shindig, or even a cozy Saturday evening alone on the couch, I already know what I’m bringing with me to sip or share: boiled cider and whiskey!

Read More >>

Food52
15-Minute French Bread Pizza Is Even Faster (Tastier!) than Delivery

15-Minute French Bread Pizza Is Even Faster (Tastier!) than Delivery

There are so many ways to satisfy pizza cravings: super-cheesy deep dish pies, crispy cauliflower versions, grilled and ranch-drizzled, or even saucy swirled breads. Honestly, I like them all. But the version I make most often is a little less traditional—French Bread Pizza—you know, the Stouffer’s frozen food.

I loved eating French Bread Pizza (FBP for short) as a kid. The cheese-covered, tomato sauce-drenched open-faced loaf was like a fancified Hot Pocket with the convenience of a frozen pizza—a kid and busy parent’s dream meal. I still crave frozen FBP when I’m feeling nostalgic, but, nowadays, I turn to my homemade version. It’s faster than delivery, easier than traditional homemade ‘za, and just as comforting as my childhood classic.

Read More >>

Make Tomato Soup Tonight, With the Help of Your Pantry

Make Tomato Soup Tonight, With the Help of Your Pantry

We’ve partnered with Muir Glen to celebrate the season with recipes, tips, and videos that making holiday entertaining easy, elegant, and totally stress-free. Up first: Cozy tomato soup combos that make a perfect in-between-parties bite.

Tomato soup is my desert island food. As in, the single dish I’d bring if I knew I were going to be stranded. I’d take the classic version I make once a week in the winter, which to me is the edible equivalent of sitting near a crackling fire, wrapped in a soft flannel blanket, reading a really addictive mystery novel.

Read More >>

Simply Recipes
Baked Sweet Potato Taquitos

Baked Sweet Potato Taquitos
These Sweet Potato Taquitos are vegan and baked instead of fried for a healthy riff on one of our favorite fried foods. They’re just as crunchy and great with some cashew cream sauce on the side.

Continue reading “Baked Sweet Potato Taquitos” »

Food52
A 5-Minute Party Starter Even Speedier Than Artichoke Dip

A 5-Minute Party Starter Even Speedier Than Artichoke Dip

What can you do with just five minutes? Actually, way more than you think! Introducing Food52 in 5: your cheat sheet for speedy, delicious recipes, fun mini projects, and more.

When I’m on the hunt for a party snack, I look for a couple of things: Can I balance eating it with a drink in hand? Is it self-contained for minimal double-dipping? How quickly can I throw it together? Oh, and does it taste delicious?

Read More >>

It's High Time to Praise Pork Butt

It’s High Time to Praise Pork Butt

I was raised Jewish, which meant for most of my life I thought the only meat that anyone ever braised was brisket. My family’s go-to recipe requires, I don’t know, 87 ingredients and yields such a surplus of gravy that if the meat is ever dry—as brisket often is—you drown it accordingly and no one will ever know.

Then I moved to the South and met pork butt. Which, technically, isn’t a butt at all—it’s shoulder; literal pork butt is ham (a fun fact for your next dinner party!) Because pork butt is oh-so generously marbled with fat, it’s rich in flavor. It’s also cheap as heck. While brisket averages at $3.64/pound, pork butt is $1.79/pound.

Read More >>

Food52
Upgrade Your Tired, Old Kitchen Cabinets With This 5-Minute Trick

Upgrade Your Tired, Old Kitchen Cabinets With This 5-Minute Trick

What can you do with just five minutes? Actually, way more than you think! Introducing Food52 in 5: your cheat sheet for speedy, delicious recipes, fun mini projects, and more.

I am a perennial renter, and given my habit of spending over saving, I probably always will be. So that means seriously renovating my kitchen is always out of the question. There are two problems with this: the kitchen is my favorite place to be in any apartment (aside from my bed, no contest there); and most of the kitchens I’ve been stuck with have been pretty outdated (laminate countertops and finicky appliances are pretty much a given).

Read More >>

Food52
How to Make the Easiest 30-Minute, Comfy-Cozy Soups All Season

How to Make the Easiest 30-Minute, Comfy-Cozy Soups All Season

Haven’t you heard? It’s fall. You officially have permission to slow down, don your fuzziest slippers, and read a novel or two with a steamy drink in hand. Although…there’s also all the apple picking, and back-to-school decluttering, and travel planning, and (early, mind you) Thanksgiving prep. I guess fall’s not so slow, after all.

But the temps are cooling, and cozier soups, stews, and braises are calling. And those take a little time to put together (for starters, you’ll want to dust off your slow cooker). But what’s someone gotta do to cozy up when they’re short on time? Turns out, they’ve gotta make soup. In her fully revised, updated, and reissued edition of bestselling How to Cook Without a Book, 17 years after its initial publication, author and former Executive Editor of Cook’s Illustrated, Pam Anderson, shows us how to make the easiest, heartiest, comfiest main course soup—in under 30 minutes, with no need for a recipe. I, for one, am here for that.

Read More >>

Simply Recipes
Roasted Sweet Potato Quinoa Bowls

Roasted Sweet Potato Quinoa Bowls
We love roasted sweet potatoes, especially in grain bowls like this one! Combine with quinoa, and top with avocado for a quick, one-bowl vegetarian meal.

Continue reading “Roasted Sweet Potato Quinoa Bowls” »

Health | The Atlantic
Why You’re Probably Getting a Microchip Implant Someday

When Patrick McMullan first heard in early 2017 that thousands of Swedish citizens were unlocking their car doors and turning on coffee machines with a wave of their palm, he wasn’t too impressed. Sure, the technology—a millimeters-long microchip equipped with near-field communication capabilities and lodged just under the skin—had a niche, cutting-edge appeal, but in practical terms, a fob or passcode would work just as well.

McMullan, a 20-year veteran of the tech industry, wanted to do one better—to find a use for implantable microchips that was genuinely functional, not just abstractly nifty. In July 2017, news cameras watched as more than 50 employees at Three Square Market, the vending-solutions company where McMullan is president, voluntarily received chip implants of their own. Rather than a simple scan-to-function process like most of Sweden’s chips use, the chips and readers around Three Square Market’s River Falls, Wisconsin, office were all part of a multistage feedback network. For example: Your chip could grant you access to your computer—but only if it had already unlocked the front door for you that day. “Now,” McMullan says of last summer, “I’ve actually done something that enhances our network security.”

The problem McMullan’s chips cleverly solve is relatively small-scale—but it’s still a problem, and any potential new-use case represents a significant step forward for a chip evangelist like him. As with most technologies, the tipping point for implantable chips will come when they become so useful they’re hard to refuse. It could happen sooner than you think: In September 2017, Three Square Market launched an offshoot, Three Square Chip, that is developing the next generation of commercial microchip implants, with a slew of originative health features that could serve as the best argument yet that microchips’ benefits can outweigh our anxieties about them.

Though new to the American workplace in this implantable form, radio-frequency-identification (RFID) technology has been around for decades, and has long been considered secure enough for commonplace use. RFID ear tags are used to register almost all farm and ranch livestock with the U.S. National Animal Identification System (in Australia, the system is mandatory). If you’ve checked luggage on a Delta Airlines flight, you can thank RFID luggage tags for the fact that your bag arrived at the same destination you did. And you probably already have a personal RFID chip that goes everywhere with you—it’s in your credit card.

[The future of wearables makes cool gadgets meaningful.]

But of course, the fear surrounding RFID implants has little to do with RFID itself, and everything to do with implantation. American pets safely receive RFID implants without complication every day; even so, many of their owners would cite something akin to safety as a reason not to get one of their own. When a company called Verichip developed its own health-care-oriented microchip implants in the early aughts, its research indicated that 90 percent of Americans were uncomfortable with the technology. The company got FDA approval for its devices in 2004, but folded just three years later, in large part due to studies that suggested a potential link between RFID transponders and cancer in lab animals. (The risks of cancer caused by RFID have since been found to be virtually nonexistent for humans and negligible for animals, and one 2016 study even suggested that embedding active RFID transponders within cancerous tumors could be an effective means of treatment.)

A decade later, floating throughout the eruptive hullabaloo around Three Square’s “chip party” were all kinds of fears—some credible, some less so—about the dangers of introducing subdermal radio technology to the American workplace: that companies might make widespread use of this technology mandatory, or that implanted microchips might be hacked or used to track wearers, or that hands might be severed in the name of home break-ins. Many critics, including state legislators working to pass bills that would restrict RFID implants, are fearful that the metal components and circuitry in the chips would mean certain death if a “wearer” were exposed to an MRI machine or defibrillator.

Then there are broader fears about the use of chip technology to track humans: Before damning research halted Verichip’s growth, the company’s chairman suggested in a 2006 appearance on Fox & Friends that Verichip implants could be used to register migrant workers at the border and verify their identity in the workplace; that same year, former Colombian President Álvaro Uribe reportedly proposed to then-Senators Arlen Specter and Jeff Sessions that the chips could be implanted into Colombian workers before they entered the United States for seasonal work. Meanwhile, some fundamentalist-Christian communities remain convinced that the microchip implant is the manifestation of the biblically portended mark of the beast. But the primary challenge to RFID implants remains the simple underlying question posed over and over again in response to the tech: Is this really necessary?

In 1998, the British scientist Kevin Warwick (known by the moniker “Captain Cyborg”) became the first human to receive an RFID microchip implant. But since then, development has been slow. Kayla Heffernan, a researcher in the department of computing and information systems at the University of Melbourne’s School of Engineering, blames the fact that chipping hasn’t yet been accepted widely on what she sees as “a chicken-and-egg problem.” “People don’t get them, because they’re not useful enough yet, but because there’s not a market, the devices [remain] relatively unchanged,” Heffernan says.

McMullan hopes to solve the second half of that problem as a means of invigorating the first. Shortly after last summer’s chip party, he began meeting with the cardiologist Michael Mirro, who serves as the director of the Parkview Research Center in Fort Wayne, Indiana. Mirro’s team and Three Square Chip developers are currently working on prototypes of RFID implants that will be able to continually monitor an individual’s vitals, enabling both patients and doctors to access highly accurate real-time information.

[Should your watch monitor your heart?]

As McMullan describes it, the decision to develop RFID technology for medical purposes was motivated by more than just business savvy—it’s what intrigued him about the chips in the first place. The technology for better, potentially lifesaving solutions has long existed, he says, “it’s just, frankly, nobody decided to take it on.”

It’s an undeniably personal project for McMullan: His wife, Leah, suffers from a chronic nerve disorder caused by a medical accident in 2009 and relies on an implanted spinal-cord stimulator to manage her pain. When he talks to her about the chips, he says, she reminds him, “If I did not have that nerve stimulator in my back I would have committed suicide a long time ago.’”

Nerve stimulators are among the many implantable technologies that have leapt onto the health-care market in full force. Insertable cardiac monitors like the Reveal LINQ have replaced sometimes finicky stick-on patches as the most reliable option for patients with chronic heart conditions, and just two months ago, the FDA approved the first-ever long-term implantable continuous glucose-monitoring system for people with diabetes.

Three Square Chip says that its medical RFID implants will be powered by body heat, and McMullan’s plans to develop a single piece of hardware to aid patients with a wider range of conditions could make the chips more affordable than devices with more specialized (and limited) functions. “Many heart patients, right now, the only time they know they’ve got a problem is when they’re in the back of an ambulance,” McMullan says.

The company estimates that it will be selling chips capable of tracking a wearer’s live vital signs in a little more than a year, but a few other developments will come first. McMullan hopes that people will soon consider storing their medical information on encrypted RFID chips, and the group is also working on a way to make GPS-enabled chips available as an option for families to track relatives suffering from severe dementia—another use for the chips that poses both obvious benefits and legitimate concerns.

“There’s an interest but also a controversy with the actual GPS tracking,” says Luis Martinez, a preventative-medicine specialist in San Juan who has worked with McMullan on chip development since before last year’s media frenzy. “A lot of parents will feel actually safe if they can track real-time where their children are, given abductions, child trafficking, and all that.” But, he says, there are even more use cases: “Other populations … are being looked at for different reasons: law enforcement, or say you could use a GPS chip to identify registered sex offenders. I think it’ll be a case-by-case basis where different countries or different societies will decide.”

At the same time as the technology is becoming more powerful, people are becoming more comfortable with the notion of implantables. “If we think about 1998 to now, a lot has changed about the way we regard the body,” Heffernan says. This shift, she says, is traceable from body modifications such as tattoos and piercings all the way up to the chips McMullan is developing. “Pacemakers are routine surgery. Plastic surgery is less taboo now.” Hundreds of thousands of American bodies now contain cochlear implants, IUDs, nerve stimulators, artificial joints, implantable birth-control rods, and beyond. “There’s a trend toward putting devices inside the body, not just for life or death situations but for convenience, such as contraceptives, menstrual aids, contact lenses,” Heffernan says. “So as we’ve become more comfortable with this, insertables become more acceptable.”

In the year since Three Square Market’s chip party, the technology has become mundane to those surrounded by it. “We don’t think about it within the company really at all,” says the customer-service manager Melissa Koepp, who chose to get the implant. Her nonchipped colleagues are similarly nonchalant about the company’s futuristic update. In fact, one of the most common reasons employees opted not to receive the implant wasn’t about the implications of the technology at all: “When I watched them chip Todd,” says Katy Melstrom, the vice president of marketing, “and I saw the size of the needle, I said, ‘Yeah, I’ll wait until we get a smaller version.’”

Yet for all of the implantable gadgets Americans use and the heaps of location-enabled gizmos we own, the first commercial device with both of these features will be significant. A teenager who brings her iPhone to the school bathroom with her can one day choose not to. If visiting a physician to remove the chip in her hand requires similar parental permissions to other invasive medical procedures, well, then, we know how that episode of Black Mirror ends.

[Why bosses can track their employees 24/7]

The key to ensuring that RFID developments are used only as intended will be meaningful and active legislation developed to cut potential abuses off at the pass. In terms of workplace RFID implants, state legislatures are already behind. Before Three Square Market’s “chip party” last summer, five states, including Wisconsin, had RFID privacy laws preventing employer-mandated microchip implantation. Since then, only five more have introduced similar bills.

“I believe this technology is going to grow exponentially, in stages, and in a very short period of time,” says New Jersey State Assemblyman Ronald Dancer, whose bill will be voted on in the coming months. “We need to make sure that there’s full disclosure and consent.”

The legal tenets of disclosure and consent can be complicated enough in the workplace, but how will lawmakers and experts in security and tech react when required to define consent for a patient with advanced dementia? “Laws should not regulate technologies, but the actions we don’t want to happen,” Heffernan says. “This is the problem with some current regulation—it’s too slow because it focuses on technologies, not actions.”

But sooner or later, the laws will change, and the frightening will become familiar. After all, all it took in Sweden for RFID implants to become widespread and normalized was the simple appeal of never having to deal with a lost key. Whenever it happens, like waves of new tech before it, implantable RFID will bring us the next iteration of the yin-and-yang symptoms of technology we’ve seen time and time again. We will likely be healthier, safer, more informed, and more connected, and we will continue to disagree over whether it matters if our privacy and autonomy were the corresponding costs.

Serious Eats
23 Family-Size Dinner Recipes to Feed Your Whole Squad

If you’re cooking for large groups on a regular basis, there’s a good chance that turning out the same vat of pasta night after night is going to get old pretty quickly. The good news is that we have a variety of more creative dishes that will feed half a dozen people or more, giving you plenty of options. Here are 23 of our favorite big-batch dinner recipes, from steak fajitas to pulled pork sandwiches.
Read More

Oh My Veggies
A Guide to Fall Produce
Apples and pumpkins get all the love and attention every fall, but what about beets? And turnips? Won’t someone please think about the turnips?! If you’re not sure what’s in season during fall, this guide is for you–not only does it list what’s in season, it also contains buying and storage tips, cooking suggestions, and recipe ideas. It’s everything you need to conquer fall cooking! And if you still need more ideas, click on over to my list of fall-inspired recipes from Oh My Veggies. Apples Peak Season: September-October Buying Tips: Apples should be firm, without blemishes or bruises. Storage: Store apples in a cool place or in your refrigerator. Because apples release gases that can cause other produce to overripen, they should be kept in a separate drawer in the fridge. Preparation & Cooking: The skin is the healthiest part of the apple, so keep them unpeeled when possible for the maximum benefit. Apples can be made into sauces, diced and added to salads, and baked into sweet treats like pies, muffins, and tarts. Different apples are better suited for different uses, so try to get the specific type of apple that your recipe calls for. Apples start browning […]

Facebook Comments

The owner of this website is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon properties including, but not limited to, amazon.com, endless.com, myhabit.com, smallparts.com, or amazonwireless.com.
Home Privacy Policy Terms Of Use Medical Disclaimer Anti Spam Policy Contact Us Affiliate Disclosure Amazon Affiliate Disclaimer DMCA Earnings Disclaimer
Skip to toolbar