The Whirlwind History of Food52's First 10 Years
The Whirlwind History of Food52's First 10 Years
The Whirlwind History of Food52's First 10 Years
The Whirlwind History of Food52's First 10 Years
The Whirlwind History of Food52's First 10 Years
The Whirlwind History of Food52's First 10 Years
The Whirlwind History of Food52's First 10 Years
The Whirlwind History of Food52's First 10 Years
The Whirlwind History of Food52's First 10 Years
The Whirlwind History of Food52's First 10 Years
The Whirlwind History of Food52's First 10 Years
The Whirlwind History of Food52's First 10 Years
The Whirlwind History of Food52's First 10 Years
The Whirlwind History of Food52's First 10 Years

Food52 turned 10 this year (ICYMI), which got us to reflecting on the past—how we started, how far we’ve come, and everything we’ve done with our community along the way. In our first 10 years, we grew from two employees (see above—hi, A&M!) to 92, collected over 50,000 recipes, moved five times, won quite a few awards, and even baked with Cookie Monster. Below are some of our very favorite moments. If the next decade is this good, we sure have a lot to look forward to.


2004

Amanda meets Merrill.

The two team up for The Essential New York Times Cookbook, the 1,000-plus recipe project that inspires them to launch a startup called Food52.

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* This article was originally published here


Far from being a delicacy that traces its roots to the antebellum South, barbecue ribs are a 20th century innovation that came about due to industrial meatpacking and mechanical refrigeration.
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* This article was originally published here

May is Asian Pacific American Heritage Month! All month long we’ll be sharing recipes, stories, and long reads to celebrate the generations of Asian and Pacific Islanders who make America what it is today.


Hidekazu Tojo came to Vancouver from Osaka, Japan in 1971. Young, ambitious, and classically trained in sushi arts, he was a perfect match for Shigeru Hirai, who was looking for a young chef to work with. Hirai offered Tojo a two-year contract at his small sushi restaurant, Maneki, in Vancouver’s Japantown. There weren’t many Japanese restaurants in Vancouver at the time, and even fewer still that served raw fish.

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* This article was originally published here

It’s not uncommon for cultures to use food as a means to further define who they are. So I ask the question: What is “black food”? Most wouldn’t think twice if someone answered with fried chicken, collard greens, and cornbread—all examples of traditional soul food. However, each year, along with Aaron Hutcherson (of The Hungry Hutch), I coordinate a virtual potluck in celebration of Black History Month, where 28 bloggers contribute original recipes from the vast African Diaspora.

Every year I’m amazed by the sheer ingenuity, thoughtfulness, and wide cultural reach of each dish and story. From Guava short ribs (Caribbean) to mbuzi choma (East African) to chicken and sausage gumbo (Southern American), a range of traditional recipes are represented in this year’s list. While not explicitly called out, what’s also represented is the influence of black migrations. The historical movement of African peoples to new destinations has led to diasporic fusions, brand-new cuisines, and a thousand rich food stories. Take, for instance, A Dash of Jazz’s “Soul Food Power Bowl,” a hybrid of flavors from her mom’s Southern roots and her dad’s Nigerian roots.

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* This article was originally published here

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