Potato Latkes

Potato Latkes

Our deli-style potato latkes recipe is made in the food processor! They’re crispy on the outside and creamy on the inside. Serve hot with plenty of sour cream and applesauce!

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November may be the time for turkey—but the second December rolls around, ’tis the season for ham. Be it super-simply roasted with spices and brown sugar or baked spiral-style with apricot jam and mustard, few main dishes stand out on the dinner table like a glazed and glistening ham.

But with every showstopping ham comes a lot of leftover meat. And delicious though it may be to munch on a couple slices cold, straight from the fridge (a thing I have done many, many times), why not repurpose the ham in one of these tasty recipes?

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A 15-Minute Dinner for When I Don't Want to Cook Dinner
A 15-Minute Dinner for When I Don't Want to Cook Dinner

A Big Little Recipe has the smallest-possible ingredient list and big everything else: flavor, creativity, wow factor. Psst—we don’t count water, salt, black pepper, and certain fats (specifically, 1/2 cup or less of olive oil, vegetable oil, and butter), since we’re guessing you have those covered. Today, we’re making a highly foolproof dinner.


Photo by JULIA GARTLAND. PROP STYLIST: AMANDA WIDIS. FOOD STYLIST: ANNA BILLINGSKOG.

Most nights, cooking dinner is how I unwind. My husband, Justin, shakes a couple martinis (always gin—two olives for me, one for him) and one of us turns on music (always loud—Lana del Rey if it’s me, bluegrass if it’s him). Then we slice and chop and stir while we catch up about the day.

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Peanut Brittle

Peanut Brittle

Peanut Brittle is easy to make at home and great for holiday gifts, or just to have around the house when unexpected guests show up. Breaking apart the brittle is a fun holiday tradition!

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I don’t know about you, but I hate washing up after a dinner party. The thing that gets to me the most is having to hand-wash the wine glasses, two per guest (because my friends are that annoying). And I particularly dislike drying them after. So, imagine my joy when I was shown a wine glass you can thoughtlessly throw into the dishwasher. And not a graceless glob, but a perfectly dainty one—with bones of steel.

To know Jancis Robinson, wine expert and author of the book on wine, is to not just love her way with words, but to madly respect her opinion. So, when she says that the glass she’s holding does all of that—adding, “I haven’t broken one in two years, and I’m clumsy”—you nod vigorously (as opposed to say, grabbing it and throwing it against a wall to test the theory).

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Stollen: The Ultimate German Christmas Bread
Stollen: The Ultimate German Christmas Bread
Stollen: The Ultimate German Christmas Bread
Stollen: The Ultimate German Christmas Bread
Stollen: The Ultimate German Christmas Bread
Stollen: The Ultimate German Christmas Bread

It’s December, which means the holidays are nigh! Today, we’re celebrating with stollen—a traditional German Christmas bread, also known as Christstollen and Weihnachtsstollen (fun fact: Weihnachten means “Christmas” in German). Studded with nuts and dried fruits then dusted with a generous coating of icing sugar, German stollen is a delicious way to celebrate these cold-weather months, especially when guests are coming in and out of your home. Here’s how to make it.


Christmas is a time of elaborate fruit-and-booze-laden breads, puddings, and cakes. It is the time of airy panettone and fruitcake and brandy-soaked puddings lit on fire. It is also the time of stollen, a traditional German Christmas treat of yeasted bread stuffed to the gills with brandy-soaked fruit and marzipan, then coated with a shell of powdered sugar.

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While some people like to only use homemade broth, we think that high-quality store-bought broth works great and is very convenient. Broth is available in either cans or aseptic packages. While I like the aseptically packaged broth better because it …

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Rinse kale leaves under cold running water. Chop leaf portion into 1/2″ slices and the stems into 1/4″ lengths for quick and even cooking.To get the most health benefits from kale, let sit for a minimum of 5 minutes before cooking. Sprinkling with …

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This Instant Pot Is 50% Off Today—& Today Only

I’m as big a fan of Thanksgiving as just about anybody—from spending quality time with family to digging into the season’s best recipes (hello, mushroom and celery stuffing), there’s little not to love.

But while I’m a little sad to see the holiday come and go so quickly (goodbye, pumpkin pie), there’s always a silver lining: Black Friday and Cyber Monday.

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Spanakopita

Spanakopita

Spanakopita! Spinach, feta, ricotta, and fresh herbs are encased in layers of flaky, buttery phyllo to create this easy-to-make vegetarian Greek pie. Spanakopita is often folded into triangles, but we opted to make it into a quick and simple casserole. Serve as a side or a vegetarian main course!

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