Now more than ever, home is where many of us are seeking refuge and solace in light of the novel coronavirus. This is a tough time, but we’re here for you—whether it’s a new pantry recipe or a useful tip for your kitchen, here are some ideas to make things run a little more smoothly for you and your loved ones.


These days, there are few recipes whose ingredient lists I have entirely in stock. But that hasn’t stopped me from cooking and baking. The truth is: Just about any recipe can withstand a substitution or three—even our most popular ones from the last decade. Will an adaptation turn out exactly like the original? Nope. Will you feel a small (but mighty!) sense of accomplishment for making it work? You bet. Below, we’ll cover smart swaps for each recipe, so you can off-road your dinner—or midnight snack—without ever leaving your kitchen.

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* This article was originally published here


When you need some clams but all you got is cans.
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* This article was originally published here

Maple Oatmeal Bread

Maple Oatmeal Bread | The Full Helping

In the last few weeks, I’ve been wondering what kind of recipes would be most helpful to readers. When I posed the question in Instagram stories, I got an overwhelming amount of excitement about homemade bread recipes.

Bread baking is one of my passions, but I still think of myself as a student, rather than an expert who’s in a position to share. Everything I know, I’ve learned from reading other people’s books, and it’s still rare that I come up with recipes of my own.

Does this make me a good person to write about bread, or a totally unqualified one? Maybe both 🙂 On the one hand, I learn about making bread every single time I do it, and I’m never totally sure my experiments will turn out (they often don’t!). On the other hand, it can be nice to learn from peers, rather than pros. And if nothing else, I’m so passionate about homemade bread that it’s starting to feel ridiculous not to share.

With all of that said, I’ve got a lovely, simple homemade bread recipe for you this week: maple oatmeal bread. Made especially tender and wholesome with Sprouted Rolled Oats from One Degree Organics.

Maple Oatmeal Bread | The Full Helping

One Degree Organics is my go-to source for wholesome cereals, oats, and flours that are not only vegan, but also organic and grown without animal-based fertilizer. The brand’s oats, which come in quick oat, steel cut oat and rolled oat forms, are also free of glyphosate, an herbicide that may have implications for health. You can check out more on the brand’s glyphosate policy—and read all about its values and commitment to transparency, on the One Degree website

One Degree’s tender rolled oats lend themselves beautifully to this bread. I created it specifically with sandwiches and toast in mind. As much as I love the airy and open crumb of sourdough, I love a good sandwich and toasting bread, with moist, tight crumb. It ensures that jam, vegan butter, hummus, and other tasty fillings stay put!

The process for making this bread is pretty simple, as far as bread recipes go. I recommend reading the whole recipe before getting started, taking your time, and enjoying the process. The recipe is up on the One Degree Organics website, but I’ll walk you through the process in photos here:

1. Mix your oats, flour, salt, yeast, butter, milk, water, and maple syrup into a sticky dough.

Maple Oatmeal Bread | The Full Helping

2. Knead till elastic and relatively smooth (the oats in the dough won’t allow it to be soft like a baby’s bottom, as is often the cue for knowing when bread has been adequately kneaded, but the bread dough should feel tender and able to stretch). Place it in an oiled bowl and cover.

Maple Oatmeal Bread | The Full Helping

3. Allow the dough to rise 45-60 minutes, or until it’s about doubled in size.

Maple Oatmeal Bread | The Full Helping

4. Transfer the dough to a lightly oiled surface, shape into a rectangle, and roll into a log, tucking the ends in gently. It should be about 4” x 8”. Transfer the dough to a greased 8 ½” x 4 ½” loaf pan.

Maple Oatmeal Bread | The Full Helping

5. Allow it to rise again for 30-45 minutes, or until it has risen about an inch and a half above the rim of the loaf pan.

Maple Oatmeal Bread | The Full Helping

6. About 15 minutes after the bread begins its second rise, preheat your oven to 350. When the second rise is finished, lightly brush the bread with vegan egg wash topping and sprinkle with rolled oats. Bake for 20 minutes. Rotate the loaf pan in the oven so that the bread bakes evenly. Return it to the oven for another 15-20 minutes, or until the whole top is a deep golden brown.

Maple Oatmeal Bread | The Full Helping

7. Using oven mitts, carefully remove the bread from the loaf pan. Allow it to cool on a cooling rack for at least 2-3 hours, or until fully cooled, before slicing and enjoying!

Maple Oatmeal Bread | The Full Helping

Maple syrup is fantastic over cooked oatmeal, so it didn’t surprise me at all that it makes this bread just the right amount of sweet. I also love the bread’s golden crust, the dusting of oats on top, and the fact that it’s equally good eaten just the way it is (so tender) or toasted.

You can head on over to the One Degree Organics website for the whole recipe. Happy baking, friends!

xo 

This post is sponsored by One Degree Organics. All opinions are my own. Thanks for your support!

The post Maple Oatmeal Bread appeared first on The Full Helping.

* This article was originally published here

Breakfast Solved: Why Yogurt is Our Morning Hero

Looking for delicious, nutritious ways to start your morning? Look no further with tips on shaking up how you serve your yogurt, and why we’re reaching for this nutrient-packed favorite every day.

Continue reading “Breakfast Solved: Why Yogurt is Our Morning Hero” »

* This article was originally published here

The Most Popular Recipes in March

Want to know what the most well-loved recipes for the month of March were? You know the ones: the recipes our Simply Sous Chefs (that’s you!) have been cooking, sharing, and talking about nonstop. Read on to see what made the cut!

Continue reading “The Most Popular Recipes in March” »

* This article was originally published here

Welcome to Set It & Forget It, a series about all the ways we rely on our Crock-Pots, Instant Pots, and stovetops for a healthy dose of comfort cooking.


Deeply in need of a warm, comforting meal after a long day of work? Under the weather and seeking something spicy to clear out your sinuses? On the hunt for an easy dinner with a minimal ingredient list that tastes like you put in hours of work? These three slow-cooker soups check all those boxes—and then some.

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* This article was originally published here

This Genius Marinade Brings Vegetables to Life
This Genius Marinade Brings Vegetables to Life
This Genius Marinade Brings Vegetables to Life
This Genius Marinade Brings Vegetables to Life

Every week in Genius Recipes—often with your help!—Food52 Creative Director and lifelong Genius-hunter Kristen Miglore is unearthing recipes that will change the way you cook.


Bryant Terry wants to help us all eat—and love—more vegetables, no matter what diet we might be following (or not following at all). In my world, it’s been working.

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* This article was originally published here

Shrimp Gumbo with Andouille Sausage

Shrimp Gumbo is like a trip to New Orleans without the plane ticket. The secret is in the slow-cooked roux — don’t skip it! Serve with white rice for soaking up the rich sauce.

Continue reading “Shrimp Gumbo with Andouille Sausage” »

* This article was originally published here

These Newfangled Cheeseburgers Are Much-Needed Comfort Food
These Newfangled Cheeseburgers Are Much-Needed Comfort Food

A Big Little Recipe has the smallest-possible ingredient list and big everything else: flavor, creativity, wow factor. Psst—we don’t count water, salt, black pepper, and certain fats (specifically, 1/2 cup or less of olive oil, vegetable oil, and butter), since we’re guessing you have those covered. Today, we’re reimagining cheeseburgers.


Where I’m from in New Jersey, a cheeseburger means one thing and one thing only—cheese melted on top of a burger—and such seems to be the consensus everywhere else. As Merriam-Webster defines it, a cheeseburger is “a hamburger topped with a slice of cheese.” My dad likes to call his a “cheddar-burger,” so there’s no room for confusion, while others call it a “quarter-pounder with cheese” or a “Royale with cheese”. But in any case, the technique is the same.

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* This article was originally published here

Quarantine Cake Wrecks

Minions, bakeries are really getting serious about this social distancing thing. First we had to stand 6 feet apart in line, now THIS:

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That’ll stop those germs!

 …not to mention provide great TikTok content, someone please film this.

For anyone missing their boyfriends in quarantine, bakers have this helpful reminder:

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 Actually, two reminders:

1) Don’t drink and decorate

2) McDonalds delivers

And for anyone missing their cans of Lysol, Clorox wipes, and every other kind of cleaner because those jerk hoarders bought ’em all:

Stephanie+San-FB-disinfectant.jpg

You know how Skittles’ slogan is “Taste the rainbow”?

I wouldn’t try that here.

You know how the universal sign for a bad year used to be a dumpster fire? 

It’s nice that we can switch that up for 2020:

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2020: Year of the Edible TP Roll. (Limit 1)

In fact, from what I can see just about every bakery that’s still open is making – and immediately selling out of – TP cupcakes. Which just goes to show: you can take away our parties, our theme parks, our desire to wear anything but PJs, and even our toilet paper – but you can’t take away our sense of humor. Keep laughin’, minions! ::mwah::

 Thanks to Anony M., Katy M., & Stephanie S. for keeping Cake Wrecks on a roll.

*****

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Social Distancing Champion Tee

*****

And from my other blog, Epbot:

Two Best Tips.jpg

* This article was originally published here

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