Welcome to this year’s Piglet Community Picks! Until the Piglet Tournament of Cookbooks kicks off in March, we’ll be posting weekly reviews of the best new books you cooked from in 2018—written by you. To see other reviews, head here. And to catch up on the books that made it into the main tournament, look no further.


I first decided to purchase the sequel to Cravings: Recipes for All the Food You Want to Eat by Chrissy Teigen because in the first book, I found so many recipes that my family and I enjoyed. But when I first picked up her second book, Cravings: Hungry for More, and started reading through it, I wasn’t initially taken with it like I was the first one.

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* This article was originally published here

What can you do with just five minutes? Actually, way more than you think! Introducing Food52 in 5: your cheat sheet for speedy, delicious recipes, fun mini projects, and more.


For a person who works in food media, I have to admit that I’m really, really bad at making myself lunch. I have all the necessary tools right at my fingertips—the plans, the recipes, even the gear—and yet day in and day out, I get the same salad from a local chain, or sandwich from a deli, or whatever assortment of prepared lunch foods is available from the grocery store at 8:30 in the morning. I deeply admire all of my coworkers who take to the kitchen at lunchtime and assemble beautiful salads or hearty toasts, or even just have it together enough to pack leftovers.

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* This article was originally published here

A recipe is full of quantities, measurements, and instructions, but it’s not just a formula. Often, it’s a memory—of that week you were in Florence, or of your mom baking cookies, or of your homeland across the world. Which is to say: Often, it’s personal.

A headnote—that blurb at the top before the ingredient list—shows this better than anything. “The best headnotes not only give you a sense of the recipe and why this particular recipe is noteworthy or challenging or different from all the rest,” Food52 Co-Founder Amanda Hesser said. “Great headnotes also give you a sense of the author and why you should trust them. I don’t want to spend time in my kitchen with a voiceless formula telling me what to do.” Whether it’s two sentences or six paragraphs, this introduction is where you can meet the person behind the recipe.

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* This article was originally published here

Don’t let the transparent green bottle confuse you: This is not gin. Italicus is rather a new Italian citrus liqueur made from Bergamot oranges, created by barman Giuseppe Gallo, who is attempting to revive the rosolio category (a liqueur derived from rose petals) by updating a classic 19th century recipe with his family’s own recipes. (The color and column is inspired by the Amalfi Coast.)

Bergamot oranges are the key ingredient here, these coming from Calabria. Some details on how they’re used:

The process includes macerating its botanicals for about ten days. Calabrian bergamot oranges from a protected area of origin (IGP) extending from the Tyrrhenian Coast to the shores of the Ionian Sea, together with Sicilian citrons, are gently pressed in cold water. This is a long-lost process called sfumatura, which releases their essential oils. The mixture is then fortified with natural beet sugar, Italian neutral grain spirit and pure water. It is produced at Torino Distillati in Moncalieri, led by the Vergnano family of craft distillers since its founding in 1906.

So, let’s give it a try.

First, be clear that this may be made with oranges, but it’s still a rose-petal-based liqueur, with a distinctly floral nose that evokes both roses and orange blossoms. There’s a rosemary-like herbal quality beneath that, but the flowers do most of the talking here. The palate of the pale gold liqueur is lighter on the orange than I was expecting, offering a quite sweet but gently oily body that provides notes of tea leaf and an herbal component — more rosemary, thyme — that builds over time. There’s a very gentle bitterness on the finish that hints at Italian amari, but it’s not a primary focus of the spirit. As it stands, think of it more as a lower-alcohol, much more floral version of a triple sec — and my suggestion would be to use it in a similar fashion.

Italicus does suggest using the spirit in a type of spritz, mixing it 50:50 with Prosecco and serving over ice. For what its worth, I didn’t care for this construction at all, which ended up much too sweet for my tastes.

40 proof.

B / $44 / rosolioitalicus.com

The post Review: Italicus Rosolio di Bergamotto Liqueur appeared first on Drinkhacker: The Insider's Guide to Good Drinking.

* This article was originally published here

When it comes to budget shopping, I’d like to think of myself as something of an expert. I adore thrift stores and flea markets, and wandering through a HomeGoods sparks immeasurable joy. I regularly peruse H&M’s online home section, and I’m no stranger to the joys of Facebook Marketplace and Craigslist.

So, when I stumbled upon a Zara Home store in Spain a few summers ago, my mind was blown. As someone familiar with the fast fashion brand, I was shocked I didn’t know it had an entire home line. Like Zara’s clothing offerings, the decor and furniture collections are reasonably priced and speak to current trends.

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* This article was originally published here


A waffle iron can do amazing things, as these 14 sweet and savory waffle recipes will attest.
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* This article was originally published here

We’ve partnered with Smithfield Fresh Pork to highlight one of our favorite cozy, cold-weather recipes that calls on a few chef-approved tips for maximum flavor.

I have always loved the idea of cassoulet, the hearty French classic of white beans, aromatics, and cured pork or sausage as well as fresh pork or poultry braised slowly in an oven and topped with a golden-brown crust. (Especially during winter, when turning on the oven is almost as good as wrapping myself in a soft, warm blanket.) I’ve never actually attempted a cassoulet, though, for one simple reason: It takes all. Darn. Day.

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* This article was originally published here

How do I start a sourdough? Then how do I not kill it? Do I need to use a certain kind of flour? Should I keep it at room temperature or in the fridge? Should I name it? And what if I have to go out of town? These were just a few of the questions that our team threw at Sarah Owens, who guest stars on this week’s Dear Test Kitchen. Sarah is a baker and author who won a James Beard Foundation Award for her cookbook Sourdough in 2015. Which is to say: She has all the answers and then some.

Watch the video above for how to, ahem, start your own starter—then tune in next week for how to put it to good use. P.S. If you don’t have a friend who has some starter to spare, swing by a nearby bakery and ask, pretty-pretty please, if you can snag some of theirs.

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* This article was originally published here


Clam, mussel, and oyster recipes for a molluscular meal.
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* This article was originally published here

Let’s play a game—you name a dish, I’ll name a potato recipe to go with. Meatloaf? Mashed potatoes. Roast chicken? Roasted potatoes. Cheeseburger? French fries. Scrambled eggs? Home fries.

We could be here all day.

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* This article was originally published here

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