For the Crispiest Apple Crisp, Look to a Sheet Pan
For the Crispiest Apple Crisp, Look to a Sheet Pan

A Big Little Recipe has the smallest-possible ingredient list and big everything else: flavor, creativity, wow factor. Psst—we don’t count water, salt, black pepper, and certain fats (specifically, 1/2 cup or less of olive oil, vegetable oil, and butter), since we’re guessing you have those covered. Today, we’re baking a classic apple crisp in an unexpected way.


Keep those scoops coming.

Photo by TY MECHAM. PROP STYLIST: AMANDA WIDIS. FOOD STYLIST: ANNA BILLINGSKOG.

Here’s a fun fact for your next trivia night: The noun—not the adjective—crisp comes from the same family as pie, cobbler, pandowdy, and slump. They are all baked fruit with a buttery, flaky, crumbly bonus, either below or above or both. In crisp’s case, that bonus is crumb topping (aka, streusel, not to be confused with streudel).

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* This article was originally published here

Over the past two decades, Americans have proved willing to do lots of things at Martha Stewart’s behest. They will decoupage. They will make their own holiday wreaths. They will boil pasta and tomatoes in the same pot, at the same time. Perhaps most important for Stewart, they will buy things with her name on them—bedding, cookware, magazines. Soon they might even buy Martha Stewart–branded weed.

Stewart is poised to conquer cannabis as the next frontier of domestic comfort. In February, she announced that she had become an adviser to the Canadian cannabis giant Canopy Growth, and now she is developing her own range of products, starting with a line of dog treats made with cannabidiol, or CBD. (Don’t worry, CBD doesn’t get Fido—or people—high; neither Stewart nor Canopy will say yet whether anything in her line will.)

Stewart’s announcement landed her among a small but growing group of celebrities who have seen dollar signs in the nascent market for legal weed in North America. Long a product sold primarily by historically disenfranchised young men risking prison sentences, weed is now the province of A-list actors and Super Bowl champions. Drake wants to sell you weed grown locally in his native Toronto. Football stars like Rob Gronkowski and Ricky Williams offer cannabinoid products to ease your aches and pains. As the legal-weed market floods with corporations vying to be the Coca-Cola of cannabis, companies are betting that celebrities might be a shortcut to mainstream success.

Perhaps unsurprisingly, Snoop Dogg is responsible for all of this. The legendary rapper began cultivating his association with cannabis long before efforts to decriminalize it gained traction in America, and he’s seen his public persona evolve on a similar arc with weed itself: once a menace to public order and polite society, now considered by many to be harmless and fun at parties. In 2015, Snoop launched his first line of cannabis with the American company LivWell, in Colorado. He called it Leafs by Snoop. HuffPost pretty much summed it up: “This makes sense.”

[Read: The art of packaging pot]

Snoop also brought Stewart, his good friend and cooking-show co-star, into the game. While Snoop’s American line was in development, he connected with Canopy Growth to see whether he could expand into the Canadian market. Canada federally legalized medical marijuana in 2001, so its market for corporate cannabis is a little more mature than in the U.S., where some state laws ban marijuana while others allow various levels of medicinal or recreational use. Snoop’s team “reached out through just the general ‘Contact us’ form on our website,” Jordan Sinclair, Canopy Growth’s vice president, told me. “We thought it was a hoax at first.” Snoop and Canopy launched the Leafs brand in Canada in 2016 (LivWell and Canopy have since become corporate partners), and then Snoop introduced Canopy’s executives to Stewart.

Before Stewart’s announcement in February, the major celebrities who had signed up to start weed brands were mostly the ones you’d expect: Willie Nelson, Tommy Chong, Damian Marley, and several rappers following in Snoop’s footsteps, including Wiz Khalifa and Ghostface Killah. Those celebrities come from subcultures where the penchant for smoke was never controversial. The real money, though, is likely to be made in selling to broader audiences, whose attention is trickier for weed brands to capture. “The industry is fairly strict when it comes to advertising regulations,” Sinclair said. “Promotion is very difficult, and credibility building and brand building are also very difficult.”

To make an end run around paid advertising, the weed industry has to find ways to get anxious retailers to carry their products. They need enough novelty to drum up excitement in the press—in other words, they need someone like Martha Stewart. “We didn’t expect the amount of traction that that announcement generated,” Sinclair recalled. “It was as much press and as much reach and as many stories as we generated on the day that cannabis got legalized in Canada, and we were the business that made the first legal sale ever.”

The power of celebrities like Stewart isn’t just in their counterintuitive willingness to be associated with weed, but in their position within commerce in general. Stewart “can make one phone call and get a meeting with any major American retailer,” Sinclair said. Without a beloved mainstream name attached, a company might go years before landing in the same store. “We’re essentially borrowing credibility,” Sinclair told me.

[Read: Martha Stewart, Queen of All Internet]

While most major North American cannabis companies have now implemented similar strategies, Canopy has had the most success with A-list celebrities. In recent months, it has announced Drake’s aforementioned cannabis brand, More Life, as well as a similar collaboration with Seth Rogen. These arrangements aren’t just endorsements, but partnerships, which are generally more lucrative in the long term for celebrities, because they involve control over branding and include profit-sharing instead of just a lump-sum payday.

This celebrity strategy is one of the oldest marketing tricks in the book. But it might not make a big difference in companies’ long-term success, says Dina Mayzlin, a marketing professor at the University of Southern California Marshall School of Business. “There’s a big debate about the extent to which any advertising is effective, but at the end of the day, it’s usually more about the product, or the logistics of how you sell,” she says. “I don’t think celebrity endorsements are that powerful.”

Mayzlin points to the beginning of internet commerce as a lesson on how a new market goes from a Wild West with many competitors and little name recognition to an intensely consolidated industry. Amazon didn’t come to dominate American retail with slick ads alone. It performed its function with the most ruthless efficiency, which is what shoppers wanted.

Still, Mayzlin sees one distinct upside to cannabis’s celebrity strategy: access to massive social-media followings. “In the past, you had to pay the celebrity, but then you also paid for media, like a TV ad,” she says. “Here, you already have the media.” That’s doubly important for cannabis brands, which can’t advertise themselves like a new type of soda can.

Even Canopy readily admits that working with celebrities is quite different from developing, advertising, and selling products on its own. Drake is the Toronto Raptors’ official global hype man, and when the team recently made a run at the NBA title, the excitement threw Canopy’s development meetings with him into havoc. “We knew the priority was making sure the basketball thing is taken care of,” Sinclair told me. “If there was a big game and we had a meeting scheduled with Drake and his team the next morning, we were like, ‘Okay, let’s move this to the afternoon.’” Still, the hassle is worth it to let the millions of people who have listened to Drake rap about weed know exactly where to buy their own.

* This article was originally published here

There Are *So* Many Instant Pots to Choose From—Here’s the Right One for You

When it comes to the Instant Pot, there’s a lot to love. Primarily, the electric multi-cooker—which is a fancy term for “all-in-one pressure cooker, slow cooker, sauté pan, steamer, and more, that plugs into your wall instead of cooking over an open flame”—can create the type of deep, caramel-y flavor typically associated with an all-day braise in under an hour. It can tenderize the toughest legumes (sans a pre-soak!) in the time it takes to watch one episode of Great British Baking Show. It can slow-cook with the best of ’em.

So it’s no wonder that Instant Pot models have nabbed the top four bestseller spots on Amazon’s electric pressure cooker list.

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* This article was originally published here

Writer Mandy Lee, whom you might know from her blog, Lady & Pups, is one of our favorite recipe developers and storytellers. In her debut cookbook, The Art of Escapism Cooking: A Survival Story, with Intensely Good Flavors, Mandy shares about her journey moving from New York to Beijing—a new home she didn’t really like, but wanted to accept because her husband’s job brought her there—and how cooking was the only thing that helped her cope with the transition. The following excerpt (plus, three delicious recipes) from The Art of Escapism Cooking is about the kind of food Mandy loves to cook when she’s by herself.


When I first arrived in Beijing, I was blissfully excited. Undeniably, a city cloaked in complicated ancient history, much of which is beautifully mysterious and some of which is evidently dark and savage, should be a pulsating magnet for anyone who is the least bit curious about the world at large, including me. Not to mention my adoration of the foods I found there, which obviously inspired many of the recipes in my cookbook. I swear that I went to Beijing with my best effort at an open heart.

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* This article was originally published here

Best Homemade Cinnamon Rolls

Best Homemade Cinnamon Rolls

These Homemade Cinnamon Rolls only taste like they came from a bakery! Soft and fluffy, and topped with a thick layer of cream cheese frosting. A make-ahead dough breaks up the work.

Continue reading “Best Homemade Cinnamon Rolls” »

* This article was originally published here

Instant Pot French Onion Soup

Instant Pot French Onion Soup

Instant Pot French Onion Soup! French onion soup is comfort food at its finest. Rich, intensely-flavored broth and caramelized onions, topped with crusty, cheese-covered bread is sure to warm anyone on a cold winter’s night. Make this delicious soup in half the time by using your Instant Pot!

Continue reading “Instant Pot French Onion Soup” »

* This article was originally published here

Sausage Rolls

Sausage Rolls

Sausage Rolls are a must-have for potlucks, Game Day parties, and holiday gatherings. Made with pizza dough and fresh sausages, they’re like grown-up pigs in a blanket!

Continue reading “Sausage Rolls” »

* This article was originally published here

Slow Cooker Banana Bread Pudding

Whipping up a batch of bread pudding doesn’t get easier than this! The slow cooker creates a smooth and custardy texture. This version is rich with bananas, warm spices, and caramel sauce for a bread pudding twist on the famous New Orleans dessert: Bananas Foster!

Continue reading “Slow Cooker Banana Bread Pudding” »

* This article was originally published here

Rinse collard greens under cold running water. Chop leaf portion into 1/2-inch slices and the stems into 1/4-inch pieces for quick and even cooking. …

* This article was originally published here

Welcome to What We’re Cooking This Week, a weekly love letter from our recipe developer Emma Laperruque, all about what the Food52 team is cooking and craving off-hours (with a few snacks for thought, too).


I stumbled upon a Thanksgiving recipe that I can’t stop thinking about: ice cream pumpkin pie (or pumpkin ice cream pie, whichever name floats your boat). It comes by way of Food52 veteran Brette Warshaw, whose newsletter What’s the Difference? you should 100% sign up for if you haven’t already.

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* This article was originally published here

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